The Viking Foundation of Lincoln

Subtitle

News

view:  full / summary

Deadline approaches for Viking Foundation

Posted by sallyanderik on September 17, 2017 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)

The submission deadline for project-funding grant proposals to The Viking Foundation of Lincoln is Oct. 1, 2017....

http://journalstar.com/niche/neighborhood-extra/deadline-approaches-for-viking-foundation/article_c698d993-05ab-5c23-a554-dd9c6a2b6450.html



Area nonprofits receive Viking Foundation grants

Posted by sallyanderik on January 15, 2017 at 2:05 PM Comments comments (0)


http://patch.com/iowa/ankeny/ area-nonprofits-receive- viking-foundation-grants


Viking Foundation grant helps Boys & Girls Club expand career exploration program

Posted by sallyanderik on August 25, 2016 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (0)

http://journalstar.com/niche/l-magazine/here-to-help/viking-foundation-grant-helps-boys-girls-club-expand-career-exploration/article_6a73b940-2ab7-5b56-b960-9159941387ec.html

 

•BY MARK SCHWANINGER, EDITOR

•Aug 16, 2016

 

A $5,000 grant from the Viking Foundation of Lincoln is helping the Boys & Girls Club of Lincoln/Lancaster County expand its career exploration program, called CareerLaunch, for teenage club members.

 

 

“Among the most prominent of our Viking Foundation’s core values is that ‘All people deserve an opportunity to learn and work, and to learn to work,’” said Steven Eggland, who created the Viking Foundation in 2012 to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals –

 

 

especially children – who are less fortunate.

 

 

 

 

 

“The modest grant we have made to the Boys & Girls Club provided us with a perfect opportunity to help put that value into action,” Eggland added.

 

 

The Viking Foundation grant “really made us evaluate what we could do to step up the career exploration program and push it forward,” said Nick Dean, executive director of the local Boys & Girls Club, which provides after-school and summer programs at Park Middle School, 855 S. Eighth St.

 

 

Before receiving the grant, the club only offered career exploration classes in a classroom setting with curriculum provided by the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, said Andy Larson, operations director at the local Boys & Girls Club.

 

 

“The grant afforded us the opportunity to expand what we did before,” he said. “Now we can physically transport kids to job sites or have business representatives come and talk to the kids at the club. It makes all the difference in the world. Otherwise, a lot of these kids wouldn’t know those careers are possible.”

 

 

So far, club teens have visited or hosted representatives from places like Career Academy (a joint venture between LPS and Southeast Community College), Crete Carrier Corporation, Duncan Aviation, EducationQuest, Old Navy, Southeast Community College, Sysco, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Innovation Campus, Wells Fargo and Talent Plus.

 

 

During a summer field trip to Talent Plus, 18 students underwent talent evaluations, Dean said.

 

 

“Afterward they called every kid up front, awarded a certificate and told everyone about their strengths,” he said. “The kids got a lot out of it.”

 

 

Marquell Richardson, 15, a sophomore at Lincoln High School, said the CareerLaunch program and a summer field trip to visit with Engineers Without Borders at UNL were excellent learning experiences for him.

 

 

“It showed me that I want to have a career building things, so I plan to major in either engineering or construction at a four-year university,” Richardson said.

 

 

“Completing the program helped me land my first job,” added Alex Torres, 17, a Lincoln High senior. “Skills I learned in the program prepared me for filling out the application and how to present myself at interviews.”

 

 

After completing the weekly CareerLaunch curriculum and visiting with various career representatives, 80 percent of working-age participants found part-time jobs this year, said Dean.

 


  • Lincoln Journal Star Article

    Posted by sallyanderik on March 25, 2016 at 12:15 PM Comments comments (0)

    http://journalstar.com/niche/neighborhood-extra/news/viking-foundation-awards-grants-totaling/article_b23a3ccd-1752-5bff-9f9b-500c9fc546f3.html


    Viking Foundation awards 18 grants totaling $60,000

    • Dec 28, 2015  

    The Viking Foundation of Lincoln announced the funding of 18 grants, including eight in Lincoln, totaling $60,000 in support of nonprofit organizations in three states.

    The following Lincoln-area grants totaling $30,000 were funded:

    • $5,000 to Boys and Girls Club—for the CareerLaunch Program to help young people explore careers, make sound decisions and prepare for careers

    • $4,000 to Center for Legal Immigration Assistance—to provide legal assistance to additional young immigrants

    • $4,000 to Child Advocacy Center—to provide forensic interviews for 20 victims of child abuse and neglect

    • $2,000 to Community Crops—to help low-income community gardeners pay annual fees

    • $2,500 to Lincoln Bike Kitchen—for general support of its program

    • $2,000 to Lincoln Lancaster County Habitat for Humanity—to develop donations and sales at the local ReStore, which will help Habitat build more homes

    #video-ad-asset-container, #video-ad-asset-container-played { max-height: 0px; overflow: hidden; -webkit-transition: max-height 1.5s; -moz-transition: max-height 1.5s; transition: max-height 1.5s;} #video-ad-asset-container.expand { max-height: 1500px; } #video-ad-asset-container .video-responsive-ad { padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top: 30px; height: 0; overflow: hidden; margin-bottom: 20px; }
    Pause
    Current Time 0:00
    /
    Duration Time 0:00
    Remaining Time -0:00
    Stream TypeLIVE
    Loaded: 0%
    Progress: 0%
    0:00
    Fullscreen
    00:00
    Mute
    Playback Rate
    1
    Subtitles
    • subtitles off
    Captions
    • captions off
    Chapters
    • Chapters

    • $4,000 to Lincoln Literacy—to support the FLAIR Program for children of non-English-speaking immigrant families

    • $2,000 to Mourning Hope—to support its school-based grief support groups

    • $2,500 to Wonderfully Made—to provide supplies, classroom space and marketing costs for its program for special-needs children

    • $2,000 to YWCA SMART Girls Club—in general support of STEM Program for 4th through 8th grade girls.

    In addition to these contributions, The Viking Foundation awarded $30,000 to these nonprofit organizations in Polk County, Iowa: EMBARC, Everybody Wins, Holy Family School and Meals from the Heartland; and in the Denver area: Front Range CAP, Heart and Hand Center, Metro Caring and Same Café.

    The Viking Foundation was created by Dr. Steve Eggland in 2012 to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals – especially children – who are less fortunate. The foundation provides charitable grants annually to 501(c)(3) organizations in three counties, including Lancaster. The grants are directed to those who are challenged with education, poverty, housing, gender, mental and physical health, and other issues.

    For information about the foundation and its history, values, proposal guidelines and 2016 submission deadline, see: vikingfoundation.webs.com.

    Denver Post Article

    Posted by sallyanderik on March 25, 2016 at 12:10 PM Comments comments (1)

    http://yourhub.denverpost.com/blog/2016/01/viking-foundation-funds-denver-nonprofits/124502/



    Viking Foundation Funds Denver Nonprofits

    The Viking Foundation of Lincoln announced the funding of 18 grants, including four in the Denver area, totaling $60,000 in support of nonprofit organizations in three states.

    The following Denver-area grants totaling $15,000 were funded:

    • $2,500 to Front Range CAP—To provide training to prevent child abuse through education and empowerment
    • $2,500 to Heart and Hand Center—To support its after-school program and services for under-resourced youth through general kitchen upgrades
    • $5,000 to Metro Caring—To provide support for its Seeds for Success job training program
    • $5,000 to SAME Café—To provide job training for its walk-in community members.

    In addition, The Viking Foundation awarded $45,000 to these nonprofit organizations in Lancaster County, Neb.:  Boys and Girls Club, Center for Legal Immigration Assistance, Child Advocacy Center, Community Crops, Lincoln Bike Kitchen, Lincoln Lancaster County Habitat for Humanity, Lincoln Literacy, Mourning Hope, Wonderfully Made and YWCA SMART Girls Club; and in Des Moines: EMBARC, Everybody Wins, Holy Family School and Meals from the Heartland.

    The Viking Foundation was created by Dr. Steve Eggland in 2012 to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals – especially children – who are less fortunate. The foundation provides charitable grants annually to 501(c)(3) organizations in three counties, including Denver. The grants are directed to those who are challenged with education, poverty, housing, gender, mental and physical health, and other issues.

    For detailed information about the foundation and its history, values, proposal guidelines and 2016 submission deadline can be found at vikingfoundation.webs.com.

    Des Moines, IA Article

    Posted by sallyanderik on March 25, 2016 at 12:10 PM Comments comments (0)

    http://patch.com/iowa/johnston-ia/four-polk-county-nonprofits-awarded-grants


    Four Polk County Nonprofits Awarded Grants

    Viking Foundation of Lincoln provides $15,000 in funds

    The Viking Foundation of Lincoln announced the funding of 18 grants, including four in Polk County, totaling $60,000 in support of nonprofit organizations in three states.

    The following Des Moines-area grants totaling $15,000 were funded:

    · $2,000 to EMBARC—To purchase 1,000 trilingual dictionaries for Burmese refugees

    · $6,000 to Everybody Wins—To support the Power Lunch Program, which provides volunteer reading mentors

    · $1,500 to Holy Family School—For books for the school library

    More from Across Patch

    · $5,500 to Meals from the Heartland—To support the Iowa Youth Hunger Fight Project.

    In addition to these contributions, The Viking Foundation awarded $45,000 to these nonprofit organizations in Lancaster County, Neb., and Denver: Boys and Girls Club, Center for Legal Immigration Assistance, Child Advocacy Center, Community Crops, Lincoln Bike Kitchen, Lincoln Lancaster County Habitat for Humanity, Lincoln Literacy, Mourning Hope, Wonderfully Made and YWCA SMART Girls Club; and in Denver: Front Range CAP, Heart and Hand Center, Metro Caring and Same Café

    The Viking Foundation was created by Dr. Steve Eggland, an Iowa native, in 2012 to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals – especially children – who are less fortunate. The foundation provides charitable grants annually to 501(c)(3) organizations in three counties, including Polk. The grants are directed to those who are challenged with education, poverty, housing, gender, mental and physical health, and other issues.

    For detailed information about the foundation and its history, values, proposal guidelines and 2016 submission deadline can be found at vikingfoundation.webs.com.

    Lincoln Bike Kitchen

    Posted by sallyanderik on September 28, 2015 at 1:20 AM Comments comments (1)

    http://journalstar.com/niche/l-magazine/here-to-help/recycling-for-cycling/article_5a558e4d-3aa7-543b-b308-5884cc4f8a18.html

    September 20, 2015 5:45 am • STORY AND PHOTOS BY MARK SCHWANINGER0

    Viking Foundation grant applications due Oct. 1

     

    Project-funding proposals are due Oct. 1 for Viking Foundation grants, which will be awarded to 501(c)(3) agencies in December. Preference is given to stand-alone projects in the $5,000 to $15,000 range. For more details and to apply, see vikingfoundation.webs.com.

     

    Thanks to generous grant funding, the nonprofit Lincoln Bike Kitchen has more tools to help keep up with the demand for recycled bicycles.

     

    The Bike Kitchen received a $5,000 grant from the Viking Foundation of Lincoln, which was founded in 2012 by Steven Eggland to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals – especially children – who are less fortunate.

     

    “Because of the grant money, we added two new boards of tools for repairing bicycles,” said Jay Mauk, Bike Kitchen board president. “We went from three to five tool boards. Having those two extra boards makes such a difference, because our mechanics don’t have to wait to get tools.”

     

    The grant money also purchased bike stands for holding bikes up while making repairs; supplies such as cables, grease and tube-patching kits; bike locks; and safety gear like helmets to give to clients.

     

    “The Viking Foundation was especially eager to fund the Bike Kitchen’s proposal this year, because it was responsive to several elements of our vision, mission and core values,” Eggland said. “It helps young people acquire or repair a bicycle, promotes physical fitness, encourages recycling and promotes safety by providing bike helmets.”

     

    From January through August this year, Bike Kitchen volunteers repaired 420 bikes, gave away 99 free bikes to kids under age 13, awarded 27 bikes earned by adults who each volunteered 10 hours at the shop, donated 11 bikes to clubs and organizations, and gave away 60 bike helmets, according to Clayton Streich, a volunteer mechanic at the Bike Kitchen since January 2014.

     

    Lincoln Bike Kitchen services

     

    Bike Kitchen services include Free Wheels for Kids, which gives away free bikes to kids under age 13. “It has been especially gratifying to me to see kids get bikes who otherwise probably wouldn’t get a bike, because their families can’t afford to buy one, Streich said. “They come in and pick one out.”

     

    According to Streich, another popular service is the Earn-a-Bike program, which offers a free bike to adults who volunteer 10 hours at the Bike Kitchen shop.

     

    “We show them how to disassemble bikes for usable parts, fix bikes and maintain them, and they earn a bike by volunteering,” Streich said.

     

    “Our whole mission is making people self-reliant and keeping money in their pockets,” added Mauk, noting that the average person who uses the Bike Kitchen lives on a family income of $15,000 or less. “If they aren’t paying for car loans, car insurance, car repairs – and health care, since riding a bike keeps people healthier and reduces health-care costs – a lot of lower-income families can get by with one car and a couple of bikes.”

     

    Mauk said that her own family of “me, my honey and three adult kids” uses only one motor vehicle.

     

    “We only drive the car if we’re going over X miles or bringing home something heavy, like a 50-pound bag of dog food,” she said. “Everybody’s got a bike.”

     

    She added that most trips people take in a car are less than 3 miles. “That’s a 15-minute bike ride.”

     

    Even when used as a secondary vehicle, a bicycle can get a person to work if the car breaks down, Mauk said. And replacing brake pads, for example, on a bike costs a lot less than paying $300 for brake repairs on a car.

     

    “Our main demographic is the working poor,” she said. “If we can help individuals get to a job, the grocery store, school, the laundromat and everyday errands, they have more money in their pockets to spend on education for their kids and other things that they need.”

     

    Outgrowing the shop

     

    The Bike Kitchen was launched in fall 2010 at a house owned by Carol Smith in Lincoln’s Near South neighborhood on South 15th Street.

     

     

    Advertisement (1 of 1): 0:09

    “Carol let us use her house a long time, and then we got too big and she needed her house back,” explained Mauk. “The Bike Kitchen was actually ‘homeless’ for two months when we only did mobile repair stations.”

     

    In June 2013, the Bike Kitchen moved into a 2,000-square-foot warehouse at 1635 S. First St., on the corner of First and Garfield streets – its current location. The building is not rent-free like the house that Smith had provided, but it is better suited for housing bicycle parts and making repairs.

     

    Today, once again, the shop is running out of room for bikes, parts and volunteer mechanics. Crowded conditions have forced several bikes to be left outside.

     

    “We’d love to keep more donated bikes, but now we have to be pickier due to our lack of space,” Mauk said. “We could use about three times the space we have for bikes and mechanics. Some days it’s just so busy and crowded in there.”

     

    The worst part, Mauk said, is having to keep a waiting list for kids who need a bike. “I don’t want any kid to have to wait,” she said.

     

    As a result, “We’re shopping to move again,” said Streich. “It’s a matter of finding a building in central Lincoln that’s bigger than this one.”

     

    Anyone interested in donating or renting space to the Bike Kitchen is encouraged to call volunteer mechanic Kyle Luttgeharm at 402-915-2453.

     

    The Bike Kitchen shop is open Sundays, noon-4 p.m.; Mondays, 5 p.m.-9 p.m.; and a women and transgender open shop the first Tuesday of every month, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m.


    Expanding Horizons summer enrichment program

    Posted by sallyanderik on April 19, 2015 at 12:50 PM Comments comments (0)

    http://journalstar.com/niche/l-magazine/here-to-help/expanding-horizons-for-youth/article_42952074-472c-5804-8f32-3b335e525f03.html

     

    Expanding Horizons for Youth

    July 23, 2014 6:00 am • STORY AND PHOTOS BY MARK SCHWANINGER, EDITOR

    Viking Foundation grant proposals due Oct. 1

     

    Applications are due Oct. 1 for Viking Foundation grants, which will be awarded to 501(c)(3) agencies in December. To apply, go to vikingfoundation.webs.com/contactus.htm.

     

    Founder Steven Eggland, who taught vocational and adult education classes at UNL for 30 years and served as department chairman, comes from a long family tradition of providing financial assistance to people in crises. His great-grandparents moved to Iowa from Norway (hence the Viking Foundation name). They, along with their first- and second-generation offspring, provided food, shelter and financial assistance to Great Depression-era victims, wayward hired hands and elderly caregivers.

     

    Eggland said he created the Viking Foundation in 2012 to ensure that his family’s giving continues in perpetuity. Viking Foundation funds are granted in Lancaster County, Neb., where Eggland resides; Denver County, Colo., where his daughter Erin and her family live; and Polk County, Iowa, where his son Erik and his family reside.

     

     

     

    Thanks to generous funding, 80 students at Arnold Elementary School in Lincoln’s Air Park neighborhood attended the Expanding Horizons summer enrichment program free of charge in June and July.

     

    The largest grant, $7,000, was awarded by the Viking Foundation of Lincoln, founded in 2012 by Steven Eggland to help improve and enrich the lives of individuals – especially children – who are less fortunate.

     

    “The Viking Foundation’s funding allows us to keep the program free for all families,” said Dayna Krannawitter, coordinator of the Arnold School Community Learning Center (CLC) and Carol Yoakum Family Resource Center (FRC). “It’s vital to our population to be able to keep it free. The kids also receive reduced-price lunches since it’s a federal Title I program for low-income families.

     

    “Without grants, we wouldn’t have had as many classes or as many kids,” she added. “We probably would have had to look at a fee structure. We’ve discussed ideas like scholarships, but we’re fortunate that we’ve always found funders who believe in our cause.”

     

    Many of the students walk or ride bikes to the summer classes due to parents working and other factors, so having the program in their own neighborhood is beneficial, Krannawitter added.

     

    “These kids would never be able to travel across town to Bright Lights classes due to the travel and cost required,” added Doug Marthaler, tenant services manager with Lincoln Housing Authority (LHA), the lead coordinating agency for the Expanding Horizons summer program.

     

    LHA formed the nonprofit Lincoln Housing Charities in 2002 to obtain grants for LHA tenants like the Arnold CLC and Carol Yoakum FRC, and programs like Expanding Horizons, Marthaler said. Other Expanding Horizons funders include Woods Charitable Fund and Lincoln Community Learning Centers.

     

    “We learned about the Viking Foundation by reading a story in L Magazine last year about a grant the foundation gave to Girls on the Run,” Krannawitter said. “We applied and were fortunate enough to be selected for a grant.”

     

    Now in its third year, the Viking Foundation funded 14 grant proposals totaling $63,500 in 2014 – a 21 percent increase over total grants in 2013, Eggland said.

     

    “I am extremely pleased to have seen a significant jump in both the number of proposals and dollars awarded by our foundation this year,” he said. “The response was tremendous, and every request for a grant would have filled a crucial need. I only wish we could have funded more.”

     

    This year’s grants included $34,500 to eight nonprofit organizations in Lincoln – Lincoln Housing Charities (for Expanding Horizons), $7,000; Bright Lights, $5,000; Center for People in Need, $5,000; Lincoln-Lancaster County Habitat for Humanity, $5,000; Girls on the Run, $4,250; Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), $3,000; Good Neighbor Community Center, $3,000; and Food Bank of Lincoln, $2,250.

     

    The Viking Foundation also awarded $29,000 to six nonprofit organizations in Polk County, Iowa; and Denver County, Colo.

     

    Deciding to fund Expanding Horizons was consistent with the Viking Foundation’s goals and mission, Eggland said.

     

    “The grant to Expanding Horizons was the largest of our 14 grants this year,” he said. “The program serves youth who are disadvantaged geographically, and it’s creative,” he said. “We like the fact that it doesn’t have a lot of administrative costs and that it has to do with education and children. It’s synchronized with our mission.”

     

    As coordinator of the Expanding Horizons summer enrichment program at Arnold School, Krannawitter’s salary is paid by the LHA. Of a dozen teachers in the summer program, half are Arnold School teachers and the rest are provided through cooperation with AmeriCorps, Americorps VISTA, LUX Center for the Arts, Spring Creek Prairie Audubon Center, Lincoln Parks & Recreation and others, Krannawitter said. Many of the teachers also lead before- and after-school clubs and programs at the Arnold CLC during the school year.

     

    Intern Autumn Kunze, a Nebraska Wesleyan University student, said she taught “Math Matters” at Expanding Horizons through AmeriCorps her first summer. “Then I just became an intern here after that.”

     

    Ditto for Courtney Smith, a theater studies major at Nebraska Wesleyan, who taught “Fairy Tale Theater” to students in the Expanding Horizons program this summer through AmeriCorps VISTA.

     

    “I feel like we’re helping to grow teachers here,” Krannawitter said.

     

    Expanding Horizons offered classes at Arnold School for three weeks in June and three weeks in July. This summer’s central theme was S.T.E.A.M. – an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math areas of interest. Activities were new every week and different in the two sessions. Students were placed in separate classes for grades 1-3 and 4-6.

     

    “I see it as a time for these kids to explore and really choose what they want to learn about in the summer,” Krannawitter said.

     

    For example, in “Rocketry,” a class taught by Arnold science specialist David Szabat, students design, build and launch their own rockets.

     

    In the “Wild Encounters” class, students are provided transportation and a free lunch at the Spring Creek Prairie Audubon Center near Denton, Neb. There they investigate what is lurking in the woods, wading in the wetlands and hiding in the tallgrass prairie.

     

    “Fairy Tale Theater” class gives kids in grades 1-3 opportunities to explore basic acting skills and act out their favorite fairy tales. For grades 4-6, “Arnold Theater Presents” teaches students about what goes into a show, like set design and makeup, while providing experience in basic acting skills and a brief history of theater. The class ends with a performance of the show “The Actor Games” by Wade Bradford for parents and friends.

     

    Expanding Horizons offers many other classes. For more information, contact Dayna Krannawitter at 402-436-1120, extension 5, or [email protected]

     


    Rss_feed